Expanding Your Social Circle: What Should You Do if You’re an Introvert?

Many would think people with introvert personality fear or dislike others. They may also assume that introverts are shy or overwhelmed by loneliness. These type of people, however, only prefer subdued and solitary experiences. They feel more energised by their own inner life than social events.

If you think you’re an introvert person, it doesn’t mean you can’t expand your social circle and meet new people. You can join social clubs in Singapore, for example, to meet people with the same interest as you.

Meeting New People as an Introvert

One way to meet new people is by attending different social events, whether it’s a convention or a party at a club. Being in a place packed with people, however, can drain an introvert’s energy. You’ll likely end up thinking about going home and with yourself. But specific strategies can help you be more social and make new friends.

Knowing your friendship preference, for instance, is an ideal way to help you during a social event. Different people prefer having close friends, while others prefer only casual friends. Pay attention to other people and see if your preferences are compatible. You can meet many people but don’t expect to make friends with all of them.

Subscribing to a club that holds monthly events also allows you to meet new people. Make this a habit to encourage you to socialise more. Find a club that suits your interests and stick with it.

Introduce your individual friends to each other and form groups. It will be easier to catch up with them if they know each other. This strategy can significantly boost your social life. Everyone in your group will start making plans for everyone and keep in touch with each other, so you don’t need to manage everything by yourself.

Why Should You Socialise More?

Friends dancing at the bar

Socialising may not be an introvert’s cup of tea, but socialisation is an important aspect of humans’ well-being. It offers several benefits to people’s mental and physical health. For instance, your friends can help you stay motivated and encourage you to do healthy activities.

Humans are social species. Scientists explain that when the primate ancestors of humans switched from foraging food by night to carrying out their activities by day, being social is their primary strength. Other researchers suggest early hominids may have evolved a basic form of language to share ideas, allowing them to develop tools to live better and evolve.

Additionally, communicating with people face-to-face can help you be more resilient to stress factors. This contact triggers parts of your nervous system that release neurotransmitters responsible for regulating your response to stress and anxiety.

Socialisation may also protect your brain from neurodegenerative diseases because interacting with others helps you train your brain. Social contact and motivation help improve memory formation and recall.

If you’re an introvert, you don’t need to force yourself to go out and socialise with other people. Take it slowly and get yourself comfortable. You may also use your existing friends as a connector to meeting new people.

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